On This Day in Black History: April 23
1820
The last slave revolt in Belize, led by two slaves named Will and Harper, occurred on the Belize and Sibun Rivers.
1955
The U.S. Supreme Court refused to review a lower court decision which would have banned segregation in intrastate bus travel.
1990
Derrick Bell, the first African-American law professor at Harvard University, took a leave of absence to protest the university's failure to hire a tenured African-American woman professor.
1993
Eritrea voted to secede from Ethiopia.

Today's Featured Page
Granvillle T. Woods
During his lifetime, Granville T. Woods held over thirty-five patents. More than a dozen of these patents were inventions for electric railways but most of them were focused on electrical control and distribution. More...


Previously Featured Pages
Cetshwayo
In 1873, Cetshwayo succeeded his father Mpande and the Zulu nation resurfaced as a powerful force in Southern Africa. Like his predecessors, he wanted to avoid conflict with the white settlers but he was obstructing the imperial endeavour. More...

The Buffalo Soldiers
The story of the Buffalo Soldiers—their unsurpassed courage and patriotism—will live forever in the annals of the history of the United States. More...

Behanzin
Behanzin, the King of Dahomey, chose the strategy of confrontation to resist French occupation of his kingdom. More...

Menelik II
Born in 1844, Menelik II was one of the most celebrated of Ethiopia's rulers, and led the most successful campaign of African resistance to repel the onslaught of European colonialism. More...

Jackie Robinson
Graduating from UCLA, Jackie Robinson began to play baseball with the Kansas City Monarchs. When Branch Rickey decided to pioneer in hiring Black baseball players, he hired Robinson on October 23, 1945. More...

Lewis Latimer
Lewis Latimer has brought light to millions around the world, yet he remains in the shadows. Although his collaboration with Edison and his genius as a pioneer in the electric lighting industry are well documented, they are not widely acknowledged. More...


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